OPPORTUNITIES | Not your usual options…

Posted by Thom Smyth, April 20th, 2017

While there’s been a lot of focus on diminishing government funding for the arts, there are still heaps of other opportunities out there if you know where to look. This month, we’ve unearthed a few of them to get you thinking beyond the government funding box. Many of them will also get you out of Perth to see work and expand your networks around the country and the world! This is far from an exhaustive list – check out the online resources available at Res Artis or Transartists. Make sure to check if it’s a supported residency or if you have to raise the funds.

Need advice on applications? We found this great resource from Arts Queensland. Still stumped? Contact your preferred auspice body (who do them all the time), or get in touch with us and we can point you in the right direction – shoot an email through to thom@performinglineswa.org.au.

That image up there? Thom caught that as part of Pony Express’ The Raft of the Medusa development at Adhocracy. See below.

HOT PICKS
ANTARCTIC ARTS FELLOWSHIP | Expressions of Interest open
For those who are fascinated by the stark icy landscape of Antarctica, and love the confrontation with the vastness of mother nature, we couldn’t find a more immersive experience than this one.

The Fellowship is a rare opportunity for artists and writers to experience Antarctica first-hand, and share this with the broader Australian community through their chosen art form. The Arts Fellows travel south by ship or plane, and spend time at Australia’s Antarctic research stations. Applications close Fri 5 MayMore info>>

ADHOCRACY RESIDENCY | 2017 Artists call-out
We love Adhocracy! Thom went last year – read his blog about it here. In 2016, WA artists Pony Express (Loren Kronemyer and Ian Sinclair) were among the 12 artists and groups programmed, and our Sydney colleagues were producing artists-in-residence Lz Dunn & collaborators. Adhocracy is Vitalstatistix’s national hothouse, supporting the creative development of new experimental and interdisciplinary arts projects. Artists receive funding to support their travel to Port Adelaide, accommodation and a fee, allowing them to spend four days and nights in an open studio environment developing new work. Each day, audiences and peers are invited through a public program of artist talks and work-in-progress showings presented across three evenings. It’s fun, friendly, informal, and has resulted in some awesome shows! Applications close on Monday 29 May. More info>>

PROFESSIONAL ARTS PLACEMENT | Shanghai International Dance Centre
The Australia Council is offering professional arts placement opportunities for arts workers to visit China. These placements will build international expertise, inter-cultural capability, foster industry relationships, and develop an understanding of the Chinese arts market. EOIs are now open for arts managers, producers, and production managers to apply for a Professional Arts Placement at the Shanghai International Dance Centre. Applications close 16 May. More info>>

THINK BEYOND THE GOVERNMENT
THE GEORGES MORA FELLOWSHIP
The Georges Mora Fellowship gives one contemporary artist $10,000 for up to 12 months’ research and given the means and uninterrupted time to work closely with the rich resources of the Victorian State Library, including access to a private study within the Library, which can be used outside normal opening hours! Applications close 23 April. More info>>

IAN POTTER CULTURAL TRUST | Early Career Artists
Get out of town with the Cultural Trust – grants up to $7,000 to assist emerging and early career artists of exceptional talent to take up professional development opportunities, usually overseas. They support applicants who can demonstrate both initiative and exceptional talent, together with an ability to convert their ambitions to reality. Applications close 23 May. More info>>

Sissy Reyes – ‘The Window’. Captured at Arteles Residency using an Ian Potter Cultural Trust grant.

GET OUT OF TOWN
ARTELES | Enter Text Residency (Finland)
Enter Text is an international residency program for poets, writers and text-based artists, taking place at Arteles Creative Center in Hämeenkyrö, Finland. The program brings together emerging and established writers & artists with various backgrounds, from all fields of literature and text-based art. Applications close 30 April. More info>>

WOMEN’S CIRCUS | Artist Residency Program
This offers female artists working in performance their very own room – for free!  The program provides up to 2 weeks of access to the Drill Hall, our training and rehearsal space in West Footscray. The Artist Residency is an opportunity for artists to explore, refine, re-develop, rehearse their work in a supportive space. Applications close Mon 1 May. More info>>

BUNDANON TRUST | 2018 Residency Program
Located in calm and luxuriant New South Wales South Coast, Bundanon Trust’s Artist-in-Residence program is open to professional artists and thinkers from all disciplines, individually or in groups, and is here to support new work, research and collaborations. This is your opportunity to apply for residency space in their beautiful surrounds. You may even spot a wisdom of wombats (actual collective noun!). Applications close Mon 19 JuneMore info>>


PROFILE | Sharyn Brand – Sound Designer

Posted by Cecile Lucas, April 19th, 2017

After touring regional WA for two weeks, the Small Voices Louder crew is back in Perth for an intensive week of audio editing to piece together some of the most insightful children’s answers recorded across the tour. On the soundboard is Melbourne-based sound artist Sharyn Brand, whose artistry in kaleidoscopic audio assemblage brings a whole new dimension to the production. In the coming days Sharyn will be weaving these small voices into an audio snapshot of regional WA kids’ brave and profound answers – we can’t wait to share the end result with you. While you’re waiting, here is a conversation I recently had with Sharyn, to hear about her artistic background and what brought her to work alongside Alex Desebrock on this production.
–Cecile–

Cecile Lucas: What first sparked your interest in exploring sound?
Sharyn Brand: I can’t really remember the first time I was interested in sound, I feel like it has always fascinated me. I loved listening to music and I spent many years as a nightclub DJ, this is where I began experimenting with composition and making my own tracks. Now, I not only have a fascination with music and sound, but also with the technical side of how it can be created and manipulated.

CL: How would you describe your approach to working with sound – and the kind of work that you make?
SB: My current works focus on the human voice. I am very interested in words and stories and how they can move people. My work is as much an exploration of listening as it is of sound, as I am investigating how people listen and what they hear.

In my current work I explore the notion of the sound bite. How a short 30-second recording of words may speak of one thing, yet the same words can be edited, truncated and rearranged, and be heard differently.

CL: How did you start working with Alex Desebrockand Maybe (   ) Together?
SB: I shared a studio next to hers in the same artist warehouse in Melbourne, and at the time my partner was collaborating with her on a wonderful outdoor children’s work. I had been doing some stage managing and was asked to join the team. I then learnt more of her development of Small Voices Louder and knew I wanted to be a part of it! I was brought on board with four other sound artists for a 2-week development at Arts House Melbourne. My work really resonated with Alex’s vision for SVL, and she offered me to be part of it.

CL: What do you like the most about collaborating with Alex on Small Voices Louder? Is there anything in particular that you learned through this experience?
SB: Alex has a real passion for giving children agency and allowing their ideas and voices to be heard. This totally aligns with my practice, and I am so thrilled and grateful to be working on this project with her. I love listening to the voices – children are always surprisingly insightful.

CL: Atmosphere, space and setting are very important components when producing immersive performance, and can influence the way people respond to the show. In your work, the concept of confined space and confessional experience is quite recurrent. What is it that you like about it? How does that environment influence the responses you get?
SB: The setup of the recording space in my current work gives the participant total control and privacy. Just like the tent world in Small Voices Louder, there is no one sitting across from them holding a microphone eliciting a response. I like that this seems to give people the freedom to be very candid.

CL: Sound art is a very direct way of engaging people with art, with a great level of anonymity, yet can feel very exposing for participants. How do you find people respond to this contradictory concept of Anonymity Vs Exposure?
SB: For me sound as a medium is both a very personal yet at the same time a very connecting and shared experience. When people are being recorded, not amplified or broadcast in the same moment, it becomes a very freeing cathartic experience. In my work no one is listened in to that present moment. As the words and sounds are listened to at a time in the future, I feel participants quickly reconcile that they may or may not hear their words again so they don’t feel so exposed.

CL: What’s next? What do you have in the pipeline after Small Voices Louder regional tour?
SB: Whilst on tour in W.A. I will be exhibiting a composition in Phantasmagoria – a free site-responsive festival located at Bogong Village, Victoria. Reflection is a self-directed headphone sound walk, responding to the theme of Phantasmagoria and the site of Bogong Village. The sounds within the piece were recorded on a two-week supported residency in 2016. The stories I collected have been processed and morphed with the impulse responses of the natural acoustics of different spaces within the Village.

Keep an eye out for the voices of regional WA kids coming at you soon!

Filed under Maybe Together